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Welcome to the web home for Field, Lab, Earth, the podcast from the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. The podcast all about past and present advances in agronomic, crop, soil, and environmental sciences, our show features timely interviews with our authors about research in these fields.

Field, Lab, Earth releases on the third Friday of each month in addition to the occasional bonus episode. If you enjoy our show, please be sure to tell your friends and rate and review. If you have a topic, author, or paper you would like featured or have other feedback, please contact us on Twitter @fieldlabearth or use the email icon below. You can join our newsletter to receive notifications about new episodes and related resources here.

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Jul 19, 2019

“Effects of Biomass Removal Levels on Soil Carbon and Nutrient Reserves in Conifer-Dominated, Coarse-Textured Sites in Northern Ontario: 20-Year Results” with Dr. Dave Morris

Forest harvesting varies greatly from annual harvests of agricultural crops, with extended times between harvests, the amount of harvested material removed, and the degree of site disturbance. Trees can grow to impressive sizes, but can take up to 60 years or more to reach a merchantable size. Because of these factors, the potential impact of these forest harvest operations on the environmental conditions needed for successful tree regeneration and growth can be substantial. Dr. Dave Morris, in collaboration with colleagues from the Canadian Forest Service, have been examining the potential impacts of forest biomass removal on the sustainability of these harvesting practices. With his team from the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry in Canada and sites from across the North American Long-term Soil Productivity Network, he’s spent 25-years looking at how forest soils and the regenerating forest recover after different intensities of forest biomass removal. 

Tune in to learn more about:

  • How does the removal of forest biomass affect the health of soil and the regenerating forest?
  • How does the forest “recover” after stand-replacing disturbances?
  • How do foresters try to minimize environmental impact?
  • How does one coordinate a 25-year research project?

If you would like more information about this topic, this episode’s paper is available here: https://doi.org/10.2136/sssaj2018.08.0306 

It will be freely available from 19 July to 2 August, 2019.

If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: https://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/

Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe.

If you would like to reach out to Dave, you can find him here:
dave.m.morris@ontario.ca

Listener Survey

As a reminder, we are running a listener survey until July 27. Listeners who complete the survey and join our newsletter will get a free, exclusive loyal listener sticker. You can complete the survey here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/N8V2YSL

Resources

CEU Quiz: http://www.soils.org/education/classroom/classes/813 

Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry: https://www.ontario.ca/page/ministry-natural-resources-and-forestry

Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ONresources/posts/2121303117916894

Dead wood facebook post: https://www.facebook.com/ONresources/photos/a.735069293206957/1796941180353091/?type=3

#MNRFScience on social media

Local Citizens Committees: https://www.ontario.ca/page/forest-management-planning

Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.